How to Adult: ROCKing a Phone Interview (Without being Awkward)

Are you super awkward on the phone? (Samesies). Here’s how I go from awkward to awesome during phone interviews!

Adobe Spark (5)I’ve done quite a bit of phone interviewing in my day as that seems to be a rising method for vetting job applicants and getting to know people before doing business with them. Now, I’m usually quite comfortable in interview situations but there’s something about being interviewed over the phone that always seems to throw me through a loop.

Maybe it’s that I try to interview with animals in the room or maybe it’s because I always forget to clear my throat before answering so that my first impression sounds like a toad. Or maybe I’m just the most. awkward. person. ever. Am I alone here? I hope not.

For those of you who, like me, feel SUPER AWKWARD on the phone, have hope! There are strategies for feeling more normal while letting your personality shine in phone interviews! Let’s talk about some because, Lord knows, I’m always in need of a refresher!

First things first, treat phone interviews like in-person interviews. And I mean this in every way. Take it seriously because impressing your interviewer could mean the difference between moving onto the next stage, being hired, or not getting the job at all.

Pro tip: Go ahead and dress for a normal interview. There’s something about looking and feeling like a professional that will boost your confidence. It’s always a plus to be extra-confident during any kind of interview!

Next, do your homework. Know as much as you possibly can about the company, job description, and industry before going into your phone interview. A great way to do this might be knowing the company’s website inside and out. Many companies even keep blogs so you can learn what they’re all about as well as current topics in the industry just by clicking around their website.

As you do your research, write down any questions you might have about the company/position/industry. Your interviewer will almost always ask if you have questions and answering no will always make you look unprepared and uninterested.

Also, Glassdoor is a great way to look at reviews of companies with examples of salaries, benefits, and CEO approvals so you know more about what you might be getting yourself into. Don’t forget – interviews are about you getting to know the company as much as they’re about the company getting to know you!

Pro tip: Keep that cheat sheet of research notes in front of you while you talk. They can’t see you and it’s better to be prepared than fumbling around trying to remember what you read. You might also consider keeping a copy of your resume in front of you with highlights of the sections you think might be important to expand upon if asked. 

Practice standard interview questions before you get on the phone. Give yourself a refresher of how to answer the big ones (“tell me about yourself” and “what is your greatest weakness” are pretty popular questions) and take some time to think overyour work experiences so that you have examples and stories to readily pull out when you need themDon’t let yourself get frazzled if your interviewer throws out random or difficult questions – they want to get to know you, and how you react under pressure is a great way to see how you might fit in the job. 

Make sure you’re in a quiet room, free from distractions when it’s time to talk. Maybe make a call a few minutes before to test the reception and make sure your phone is charged and on loud. And as I learned this week, having a dog in the room during a phone interview is a bad, bad idea so pick your location wisely. Also,  have a glass of water nearby to avoid the feeling of cotton balls in your mouth when it inevitably goes dry from all the talking.

Once you’re on the phone, stand up to talk. Ever heard of the power pose in yoga?Standing will make you feel and sound more confident and a lot less awkward than sitting in your bed as you talk about being a productive member of society. Smiling while you talk makes you sound friendly and approachable and helps to vary the tone of your voice to give the impression that you’re upbeat, interested and engaged. And don’t forget to ask about next steps and following up before you hang up the phone!

And, of course, be yourself. Or screw it all and be a cat because who wouldn’t want to sleep all day? The choice is yours. Meow.

But really though, what do you think? Are you ready to ROCK your next phone interview? Any tips you’d add to my list?

Jackie’s 5 Easiest Ways to Craft an Eye-Catching Resumé

Are you like me in that you despise talking about yourself? There’s something so awkward about bragging about your accomplishments, trying to explain why you’d be a great fit for that awesome new job. Lucky for you, I’ve got a few tips and tricks that might help when building out your resumé!

Adobe Sparklove helping people write resumes! It’s one of my favorite projects to work on because it’s all about putting things in a positive light and making the most out of every experience. I spent a few years in college learning from the best of the best when it comes to resumes and as I recently restructured my own, I thought I would share my 5 favorite tips and tricks to building an eye-catching professional resume!

  1. Keep It Simple, Stupid. The KISS method is a great way to go about doing life, but I feel like it applies to resumes very well also. You want your potential interviewer or employer to be able to get a good impression of you very, very quickly so having a clean, uncluttered layout with only important and relevant content will go a long way. Does your resume still list awards from high school? Do you have college courses listed even though you graduated two years ago? Get rid of that stuff, you don’t need it! Keep your resume short and to the point as much as possible and try to keep it to one page.
  2. Create a “kitchen sink” version of your resume where you compile the details of every work experience, big or small, to pull from when you need it. You want to keep track of all your different work experiences but you probably don’t need to list it all for every job you apply for. Some experiences might be more valuable when applying for different jobs down the road so you definitely don’t want to lose all that info. Having everything ready to go in one document makes it nice and easy to cut and paste when creating different versions of your resume for different jobs. Which brings us to….
  3. Targeting your resume can help you de-clutter and decide which of your experiences might be worthy of creating the impression you want. Look back over your “kitchen sink” resume and pull those experiences that are most relevant to the type of job you’re looking for. Wanting a job in marketing? Unless you spent your time doing marketing and advertising for the pool, your summer as a lifeguard may not be needed here.
  4. Use past-tense action verbs when describing the skills you picked up with each experience. Again, you want the person in charge of looking over resumes to get a good impression of you quickly. Most employers spend fewer than 10 seconds looking over resumes so you want the first things they see to show off your skills and abilities in clear, confident ways.
  5. Don’t make employers guess what skills or experiences you picked up at your job. You want every work experience to have details about your time there, lists of transferable skills that speak clearly about what you learned or how you developed. For instance, perhaps you worked as a summer camp counselor. While listing “child care” under this experience would be accurate, perhaps a more detailed listing like “oversaw the instruction of 18 elementary-aged children” or “facilitated arts and craft activities for 30 preschoolers” would give your interviewer a more comprehensive idea of what you did as a camp counselor.

I know a lot of this may sound like a no-brainer but making these little changes can go a long way in presenting the best version of yourself. Have any questions about formatting or wording content to best describe your skills and experiences? Shoot me an email or comment and I’m happy to help out!